Oaktown Pirate

On Occupy Oakland #J28 Move-in Day march, Officer Rodney Kirkland, OPD badge #119, SHOVED a woman off her bike as the riot-line advanced past her, and they arrested her. I later witnessed Kirkland swat a cam-phone out of a protester’s hand while he was filming an arrest, but I didn’t save the footage.

Kirkland is also accused of swatting an OO Street-Medic later in the day w/ his BIG-MAN STICK. Said medic happens to be a 19yo cancer patient who weighs ~100lbs (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/28/occupy-san-francisco-cancer-patient

­) , who was at the time kneeling on the ground, treating someone for tear-gas at the ILLEGAL KETTLE @ 19th & Telegraph (No exit option was offered). Vid of Miran being carried by paramedics into the ambulance calling out “OFFICER 119!” coming soon.

Rodney Kirkland, as an Oaklander I’m am fucking ASHAMED to see you wearing the uniform of my City. You are a fucking VIOLENT, PROTO-FASCIST MENACE, and people from Scotland, Cairo, India, NZ/Australia, and ALL OVER THE FUCKING WORLD know your name and badge number (119) and WATCHED YOU LIVE AND DIRECT ON THE INTERNET being an abusive piece of shit.

These pictures are forever, and forever your name (Rodney Kirkland, OPD #119) will be associated with BEING A VIOLENT, ABUSIVE PIECE OF SHIT HIDING BEHIND A BADGE!

I fucking love technology. TRANSPARENCY, AHOY!

Around 11:30p.m. on Wednesday night, a contingent of about 60 police in riot gear appeared at the Occupy Oakland vigil in Oscar Grant Plaza and arrested about eight to twelve people, many of whom are members of the media team. The police abruptly left after “destroying everything” at the peaceful vigil, and no reason was given for the sudden raid and arrests. A small group of a dozen (which soon grew to forty) Occupiers immediately marched to the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office to protest the random arrests and show support for those being held in custody. They were told by a group of police in front of the jail that if they came closer, they would also be arrested…

occupyallstreets:

When Police Abuse Surveillance Cameras
The ACLU has portrayed Chicago’s extensive crime camera a system as a $60 million threat to privacy. Turns out Chicago police officers sometimes see the system as a threat to their privacy as well.
In the wee hours of June 13, 2009, a Chicago camera scanning a West Side neighborhood recorded a small, rowdy party taking place in a vacant lot. A young man standing in a nearby yard also comes into focus.
All of a sudden, the camera’s circuitous route is interrupted, diverted back to the party and then pointed at an empty stretch of sidewalk. It stays on that spot for about 10 minutes, and when it returns to its regular rotation we see not one, not 10, but 19 police cars on the street next to the party. In the intervening period, police had arrived in force to break up a fight.Torri Hamilton, the lawyer of the young man who had been standing in the yard – and was subsequently charged with resisting arrest, though later cleared – says police officers went in with mace and billy clubs to disperse the crowd.
Chicago’s police-run crime cameras require manual control to be diverted from their usual scan. To Hamilton, the re-positioning of this camera, at essentially nothing, suggests the police, after receiving a call about the fight, had diverted the camera so that their use of force would not be recorded.
Apparently, diversions of crime cameras are not uncommon. Along with their recently published study on the effectiveness of crime camera systems, the Urban Institute released a handy guide for officials planning on implementing their own surveillance plan. The authors warned: “cameras may be diverted to another viewable area when an incident occurs and catch little or nothing of the incident itself.”
Source

occupyallstreets:

When Police Abuse Surveillance Cameras

The ACLU has portrayed Chicago’s extensive crime camera a system as a $60 million threat to privacy. Turns out Chicago police officers sometimes see the system as a threat to their privacy as well.

In the wee hours of June 13, 2009, a Chicago camera scanning a West Side neighborhood recorded a small, rowdy party taking place in a vacant lot. A young man standing in a nearby yard also comes into focus.

All of a sudden, the camera’s circuitous route is interrupted, diverted back to the party and then pointed at an empty stretch of sidewalk. It stays on that spot for about 10 minutes, and when it returns to its regular rotation we see not one, not 10, but 19 police cars on the street next to the party. In the intervening period, police had arrived in force to break up a fight.

Torri Hamilton, the lawyer of the young man who had been standing in the yard – and was subsequently charged with resisting arrest, though later cleared – says police officers went in with mace and billy clubs to disperse the crowd.

Chicago’s police-run crime cameras require manual control to be diverted from their usual scan. To Hamilton, the re-positioning of this camera, at essentially nothing, suggests the police, after receiving a call about the fight, had diverted the camera so that their use of force would not be recorded.

Apparently, diversions of crime cameras are not uncommon. Along with their recently published study on the effectiveness of crime camera systems, the Urban Institute released a handy guide for officials planning on implementing their own surveillance plan. The authors warned: “cameras may be diverted to another viewable area when an incident occurs and catch little or nothing of the incident itself.”

Source